Ice Breakers are a great way to get people to learn each others names, find out interesting things about one another, and help people begin new relationships.

Aside from name games, ice breakers provide a way to establish common ground between participants, get everyone moving, and create a inviting environment.

These type of activities are especially important on the first day of camp - in fact, leading fun ice breakers helps counselors set ground rules, ease camper anxiety, and start the day off on the right foot.
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2 Truths and a Lie - Ask each person in the group to think of two true facts about...
Action Syllables - With the group standing in a circle, have the participants each choose...
Alphabet Actors - Divide players into groups of three or four. The leader then calls...
Amazing Shrinking Blanket - Explain to the group that because the ground is so cold, you’ve provided...
Animal Alphabet - The leader starts with the name of an animal that starts with the letter...
Astronaut - Camp Leader says: ‘Im going to outer space. And im going to take a…’...
Band-Aid Tag - One person is "it." Whenever someone is tagged by "it" they must hold a...
Barnyard - Each person is given the name of an animal with approximately three-five...
Bibbity Bibbity Bop - One person is in the middle of the circle. He walks up to someone in...
Bippity boppity boo - Everyone stands or sits in a circle with one "It" person in the middle....
Birthday Line Up - This is a great team building or ice breaker activity. Inform that...
Bubble Gum Art - Give each participant a piece of bubble gum to chew, a toothpick and an...
Bumpety Bump Bump - All players stand in a circle with someone in the center.   The person...
Bumpity Bump Bump Bump - Arrange all players in a circle. Give them time to ask the names of the...
Candy Ice Breaker - Put about enough candy in a bowl for each person in the room to take at...
Chivalrous Couples - One person with a loud voice will stand on a chair or other high place...
Clump - Have everyone stand at least five feet apart, so that when you spread...
Compass Name Game - Have participants stand in a circle. One volunteer stands in the middle...
Crocodile Race - Form teams of 4 - 10 players. Each team stands in a straight line....
Cross If You…. - Have everyone sit in a circle with you in the center. You can either...
Double-Whammy Name Toss - 1) Start the activity with the traditional name toss. 2) Once the...
Ducks and Cows - This is a great way to divide a large group into two smaller groups....
Elephants, Cows and Giraffes - Get into a circle with one person in the center. This person will then...
Evolution aka Ultimate Person or Transformation - This is a "rock-paper-scissors" themed game. Have the group in a...
Face to Face - The leader has the group randomly pair up. Once introductions between...
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Using Ice breakers Successfully:


Using ice breakers successfully is similar to being able to tell a good story: you need to know your audience, delivery is everything, and good stories build up intensity as they go along. And props never hurt if you have them…

  1. Know your audience. Before deciding which activities to use, assess the group for the following: age, familiarity with one another, purpose of the group gathering, and potential considerations for physical abilities.

  2. Build in intensity. A general rule of thumb is a start with activities with limited movement, minimal physical contact, and most simple of rules, and progressively increase each of those factors. For example, start with a simple name game, then a common ground activity, and then a more active game that has some physical contact (ie, “high fives” or holding hands), and possibly an activity that has lots of motion. Generally, with youth you can move pretty quickly into highly active, or silly games that get everyone laughing. For “too-cool” teens or “very serious” adults, you need to proceed very slowly. You can always tell how things are going by the level of conversation and laughter.

  3. Be very flexible. As with most games, you can change the rules to suit the group. For a group of young campers, you may want to roll a large beach ball instead of throwing an object during a name game, for teens, you may want to throw many objects simultaneously, etc.

  4. Participate enthusiastically. The whole point of name games and ice breakers is to help participants break down barriers, learn something about the others in the group, and most of all… have fun. Be sure to play an active role in the game, as it is important that the campers learn something about you as well. This goes equally as well for corporate or youth groups, too!

  5. Use fun props. Buy rubber chickens, silly rubber faces, fun stuffed animals, or other objects that create laughter or interest by themselves. Whenever possible, use these props in place of tennis balls, or whatever standard objects you might use. If you don’t have any, don’t worry, the activities are fun enough, fun props are just a bonus!

  6. Use activities that use the same prop (or maybe none at all). For example, you may not always have a tennis ball hand for a name toss. So, instead of a tossing an object, use high fives, or winks, etc. You might only have a tennis ball rattling around in your trunk, so learn five or so games that you can use with just a ball.

  7. Change your routine. When you learn a new game, you present it with contagious enthusiasm. When an activity seems stale while you are presenting it, it’s time to change your routine and learn a new game to become enthusiastic about. We know a great web site...


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